Foist: Put not your foists upon me; I shall scent them

MW

Now as concerninge the two articles obiected by your most excellente maiestye, whether I woulde acknowledge those bookes which were named, and be publyshed in my name, or whether I would mainteine & not reuoke thē: I haue geuē resolute answere to the first, in the which I persist & shall perseuer for euermore, yt these bookes be myne, and publyshed by me in my name, vnlesse it hath syth happened that by some fraudulent misdealing of myne enemies there be any thyng foysted in them, or corruptly corrected? For I will acknowledge nothing, but that I haue wrytten, and that which I haue wrytten, I will not deny.

Author and Text

No! Time, thou shalt not boast that I do change,
Thy pyramids built up with newer might
To me are nothing novel, nothing strange,
They are but dressings Of a former sight:
Our dates are brief, and therefore we admire,
What thou dost foist upon us that is old,
And rather make them born to our desire,
Than think that we before have heard them told:
Thy registers and thee I both defy,
Not wond’ring at the present, nor the past,
For thy records, and what we see doth lie,
Made more or less by thy continual haste:
This I do vow and this shall ever be,
I will be true despite thy scythe and thee.

Author and Text

Many men to fetch over a young woman, widows, or whom they love, will not stick to crack, forge and feign any thing comes next, bid his boy fetch his cloak, rapier, gloves, jewels, &c. in such a chest, scarlet-golden-tissue breeches, &c. when there is no such matter; or make any scruple to give out, as he did in Petronius, that he was master of a ship, kept so many servants, and to personate their part the better take upon them to be gentlemen of good houses, well descended and allied, hire apparel at brokers, some scavenger or prick-louse tailors to attend upon them for the time, swear they have great possessions, bribe, lie, cog, and foist how dearly they love, how bravely they will maintain her, like any lady, countess, duchess, or queen; they shall have gowns, tiers, jewels, coaches, and caroches, choice diet,

“The heads of parrots, tongues of nightingales,
The brains of peacocks, and of ostriches,
Their bath shall be the juice of gilliflowers,
Spirit of roses and of violets,
The milk of unicorns,” &c.


as old Volpone courted Celia in the comedy, when as they are no such men, not worth a groat, but mere sharkers, to make a fortune, to get their desire, or else pretend love to spend their idle hours, to be more welcome, and for better entertainment.

Author and Text

For it matters not how small the beginning may seem to be: what is once well done is done for ever. But we love better to talk about it: that we say is our mission. Reform keeps many scores of newspapers in its service, but not one man. If my esteemed neighbor, the State’s ambassador, who will devote his days to
the settlement of the question of human rights in the Council Chamber, instead of being threatened with the prisons of Carolina, were to sit down the prisoner of Massachusetts, that State which is so anxious to foist the sin of slavery upon her sister,—though at present she can discover only an act of inhospitality to be the ground of a quarrel with her,—the Legislature would not wholly waive the subject of the following winter.

Author and Text

Explore the older senses of the word. In the last example, the author plays with the senses related to trickery and smell.

foist, v.2 Etymology: < foist n.2

Obsolete exc. dialect.
intransitive. To smell or grow musty.

OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2021. Web. 31 March 2021.

† foist, v.3 Etymology: variant of fist v.2
Obsolete.
intransitive. To break wind silently.

OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2021. Web. 31 March 2021.

This mortalitie first began amongst olde men, for they taking a pride to haue their breasts loose basted with tedious beards, kept their houses so hot with these hairy excrements, that not so much but their very wals sweat out salt Peter, with the smoothering perplexitie, nay a number of them had meruailous hot breaths, which sticking in the briers of their bushie beardes, could not choose, but (as close aire long imprisoned) engender corruption. Wiser was our brother Bankes of these latter dais, who made his iugling horse a cut, for feare if at anie time hee should foist, the stinke sticking in his thicke bushie taile might be noisome to his auditors. Should I tell you how many purseuants with red noses, and sargeants with precious faces shrunke away in this sweat, you would not beleeve me.

Author and Text

MOS: A plot for you, sir.
VOLT: Come,
Put not your foists upon me; I shall scent them.
MOS: Did you not hear it?

Author and Text